Conference Program Memory Laws in Post-Transitional Democracies: Case Studies form Post-Communist States Conference

Keynote: Memory Laws and Memory Wars in Russia – prof. Nikolay Koposov, Emory University

I PANEL: THE PAST ON TRIAL

• Misjudging history at international criminal trials: legal justice vs. historical truth

– dr Nevenka Tromp, University of Amsterdam

• The Katyń case at Strasbourg. Is the ECtHR actually a court of (legal) conscience?- prof. Ireneusz Kamiński, Polish Academy of Sciences

• The Soviet past: the jurisprudence of the ECtHR in cases against Lithuania
– dr Nika Bruskina, Vilnius University

II PANEL: SHAPING HISTORICAL AND POST-TRANSITIONAL NARRATIVES THROUGH LAW
• Production of the public knowledge and dealing with the past: beyond post-Communism

– prof. Jiří Přibáň, Cardiff University

• Citizenship law as memory law in post-transition Latvia and Estonia: a useful concept?

– dr Eva-Clarita Pettai, University of Jena

• Memory laws in times of (memory) war: Ukraine’s militant democracy problem

– dr Maria Mälksoo, University of Kent, Brussels School of International Studies

III PANEL: CHALLENGING HISTORICAL FACTS AND NATIONAL TRUTHS

• From Fascist dictatorship to popular democracy: law, revolution and constitutional identity

– dr Cosmin Sebastian Cercel, University of Nottingham School of Law

• The past in Hungary’s Fundamental Law

– dr Miklós Könczöl, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

• “National untruth”. Controversial Law on the Polish Institute of National Remembrance

– prof. Mirosław Wyrzykowski, University of Warsaw

• The Balkans: past, nation and Europeanisation

– drs. Anna Milosevic, University of Leuven

Registration by September 20th: phrc@man.poznan.pl

There is no conference fee!

Memory Laws in European and Comparative Perspectives (MELA) is a four-nation, EU-sponsored research consortium gathered to examine memory laws throughout Europe and the world, organised with the generous support of Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA). MELA participating academic institutions are: Queen Mary University of London, T. M. C. Asser Instituut – University of Amsterdam, University of Bologna and Institute of Law Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

In Sanskrit, the word mela means ‘meeting’ or ‘gathering’. That image recalls the pan-European role of memory laws, but also elicits a para-dox. State-constructed memory ‘gathers’ citizens under a mantel of symbolic unity, yet, in a multicultural society, precariously threatens that unity. Thus, the core questions we are trying to answer are: When do memory laws conflict with values of democratic citizenship, political pluralism, or fundamental human rights? Are the punitive laws inevitably abusive? Are the non-punitive ones mostly benign? Are there optimal ways for states to propagate historical memory?

By | 2018-07-10T13:20:46+00:00 July 10th, 2018|General News, History, Memory, Memory and Discourse, Memory and Politics, New Research, Paper Call, Politics, Postcolonial Studies|Comments Off on Conference Program Memory Laws in Post-Transitional Democracies: Case Studies form Post-Communist States Conference